Spinal Orthoses Services

Spinal orthoses are effective in the treatment of scoliosis and thoracic-lumber disorders. Treatment involves a system of applied pressure and relief to opposite sides of the spine to redirect lateral curvature.

TLSO (Thoracic Lumbar Sacral Orthosis)

TLSO (Thoracic Lumbar Sacral Orthosis) refers to the region of the back these braces support, including the thoracic, lumbar and sacrum part of the spine. It also refers to the area where the thoracic and lumbar sections meet, which is known as the thoracolumbar region. TLSO braces are used to put pressure on unnatural curves that an individual may have, it then slows down the growth to eliminate the progress of the curve. It is typically a two-piece clamshell design, extending from just below the collar bone to the pelvis, supporting and stabilizing the spine after surgery or a spinal fracture, spinal disorder, or a different problem that needs structural support.

Jewett TLSO

Jewett TLSO supports the thoracic and lumbar spine by preventing twisting and flexion (bending forward). It keeps the back in the correct position while healing from injury and/or surgery. Utilizing three points of pressure, the Jewett is diamond-shaped in appearance with pads at the sternum and lower abdomen. Additionally, there is a padded posterior strap which completes the hyperextension force.

CASH (Cruciform Anterior Spinal Hyperextension) TLSO

CASH (Cruciform Anterior Spinal Hyperextension) TLSO controls unintended thoracic flexion and promotes good spinal alignment. The three-point system of this rigid brace offers a triplanar control. The rigid front portion of the frame stretches vertically from between the hips to the sternal notch. It also has pads on either side of your midsection and a back-support pad. This combination limits spinal flexion as well as other motion of the trunk. The lower pad is articulating and the upper pad can be adjusted to be either fixed or articulating, depending upon preference and/or doctor’s orders.

LSO (Lumbar Sacral Orthosis)

LSO (Lumbar Sacral Orthosis) provides effective compression with adjustable/removable side panels designed to provide rigid lateral support for a higher degree of spinal/trunk support.
Scoliosis, or curvature of the spine, generally develops during pre-adolescent growth. Spinal orthoses designed for treatment attempt to correct to the degree possible, and/or limit further progression of spinal deformity during the completion of growth and attainment of spinal maturity.

Scoliosis TLSO Body Jacket

Scoliosis TLSO Body Jacket provides three or four biomechanical forces to help the correct scoliotic spine. The brace is generally limited to address curves with an apex at or below T7-8.

Nighttime Bending TLSO

Nighttime Bending TLSO, also called the Charleston Bending Brace, is worn only while sleeping, allowing the patient to participate in normal daytime activities. The Charleston Bending Brace is a more rigid brace, which bends the torso and puts bending forces at certain specific locations on the patient’s spine. Since bone grows in response to stresses place on it, these forces over time alter growth rates of the vertebrae. When wearing the brace, the patient’s body is bent towards where the brace is pushing.

The Providence Nocturnal Scoliosis System

The Providence Nocturnal Scoliosis System is a hyper corrective orthosis that is worn at night to treat adolescent ideopathic scoliosis. This revolutionary orthosis has gained in popularity because of its effectiveness in treating scoliosis and its enhanced ease of compliance among adolescent patients. The Providence Nocturnal Scoliosis System combines the precise grid coordinates of the patented measuring board and utilization of a CAD/CAM system to effectively establish consistent spinal modification strategies. The Providence Nocturnal Scoliosis System aggressively corrects the scoliotic curves while the patient sleeps. The Providence is also effective for obese, juvenile and neuromuscular patients.

Milwaukee CTLSO

Milwaukee CTLSO is designed to provide three- and four-point biomechanical forces while actively stimulating a vertical stretch from the patient.